You have to fight for your right…

Back in the 80’s and 90’s Beastie Boys were the bad boys on the radio fighting for their right to party. More and more today it seems as though you have to fight for your rights for anything.  From your constitutional rights, to your civil rights, to your rights within the laws, your rights are being trampled on, ignored, and violated. Why is it this way? Much has to do with people’s own ignorance. They simply do not know their rights and let people tell them what their rights are or how they are to be treated. If you are tired of this like I was, get informed, get educated, and begin flexing your rights. I live in Indiana, in the USA. So my particular rights may be different than someone in Texas, California, or Australia. But the baseline message remains the same. Know your rights and know the laws. I want to state I am NOT A LAWYER, and I am not giving legal advice, other than educate yourself.

OK, OK, you say know the laws but there are literally tens of thousands of laws all at different levels; International laws (Across country boarders), Federal laws (across state lines), State Laws (within your state), County Laws (County within state), Town/City laws or ordinances, and sometimes HOA (Home Owners Association) for your individual neighborhood.  Start with some basic ones and branch out to what matters to you. I will give some examples along the way that I have come across in the last 6 years since I work up and begin to take back my life.

Constitution

The US Constitution

 

While I could probably give you examples of how our federal government has violated every single one of these, it doesn’t make it right. It takes a lawsuit to correct the violations, and that can even go all the way to the Supreme Court.  Every American should read it, and at least have a paper copy somewhere available to them. Some examples are in the news lately, with the Executive Orders being signed to bypass Congress, to the Debts we incur as a country in the Federal Deficit, to declaring war on other countries, even if you do not call it a “war”. Calling something an “armed conflict” on foreign soil is nothing more than a lie so they can violate the law.

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html

https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution

Rights

The Bill of Rights

The Bill of Rights are the first 10 amendments to the constitution. These are not laws for the people, but are supposed to be laws for the government to protect your rights as a people, as a citizen. EVERY one of these rights has been violated by our government, and sometimes regularly. From The Patriot Act, to No Knock Raids, to “Protest Areas” marked by police. This again must be brought up through the court system. If you are working poor, or just poor, unless some lawyer agrees to pursue your case on your behalf pro-bone (without charge) to make a name, or to do the right thing, changes are the government from federal to local will keep stepping on your rights. It will not be until We The People stand up and say enough before a change will happen. Give you some examples in my own life.

A neighbor has an issue with her next door neighbor. He comes out yelling profanities at her for a past issue. He is on his property, she is on hers. She finally has enough and yells back, she doesn’t appreciate it. Cops show up and say they will take her to jail if they get called back out. She came to me and I explained, I am not a lawyer, but Your Freedom of Speech is protected, as is your neighbors. The cops can’t arrest you for this. She then explained the cop asked permission to enter her house. She refused, but again, Right to Freedom from Searches without cause.

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights.html

https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/billofrights

Protestors against the BLM (Bureau of Land Management) out in Nevada, along with the BLM issue with the Bundy’s Ranch in general, is another issue recently. Police told protesters that they could only protest in a certain area, and when they did not comply they were arrested. This is against 1st Amendment, Freedom of Speech. BLM overstepped their authority vs. State rights in the 10th Amendment.

You will also see the 10th Amendment coming up more as States overrule Federal programs and laws. Powers not granted to the federal government shall remain with the state. From FDA “Right to Try” laws, to Marijuana, to gun rights, to NSA spying, to Common Core school requirements, lots of states are stepping away from Federal laws, and mandates. Learn more about the 10th amendment imitative below

http://tenthamendmentcenter.com/

If there is a particular issue you have on your mind, or you have come across research it. Is it Federal. State, County Local etc. I can’t go into all the laws I have researched lately but I can go into some that opened my eyes or confirmed something I held to be true.

Indiana Constitution

Indiana Laws or IC Codes

In Indiana, once you have your “Permit to Carry” you may open or conceal carry a firearms with certain limitations on location such as schools, federal buildings and property, casino, on planes and a few others. Texas is making a big deal that they now can open carry. Well, we have been doing that for a long time. Now I know the “school” was loosely defined and that citizens attending colleges wanted the right to protect themselves. Since this didn’t impact me at the time I didn’t dig deeper. But here it is again, if you do not like how the law is, then know your rights and do something about it.

In Indiana, it is perfectly legal to carry a Viking axe in public, along with long blades, switch blades, folding blades. The only thing I believe is illegal is throwing stars, and knives that have projectile blades that separate from the handle.

In Indiana, the homeschooling rule is that the minimum requirement is 180 days of education, and kids must be enrolled in formal education by age 7. That is it, no testing, no curriculum approval, no home visits, no teacher approval. You can even make their own diploma. I was “told” I could not do this, I needed a letter to the principal, I needed to file with the state, I needed to make the take the ISEP (Standardized testing). All a bunch of lies. I dug deeper and educated myself on what was the law.

In Indiana, if your kids attend public school, they are not required to participate in standardized testing (ISTEP). You as a parent, or guardian can opt out. I was told they are REQUIRED to take this test, and pass in order to graduation. This is utter fiction, and false. If you get a bunch of negative attention to the student (extra work, ostracized, or punished) you can file a lawsuit against the school, as this IS against the students rights.

In Indiana, an agent of the State (Someone employed by a government agency) may not enter your property without a warrant. This includes CPS, police, health inspectors etc. There are cases such as probable cause, and Building inspectors for “Emergency Safety”. Again I am not a lawyer, but this has held for my own experiences, more than I would like to have had.

I may not sell plants across state lines here in Indiana without regulation, permitting, and inspection. You cannot ship plants in soil through the mail system without regulations. This is why most places come “bare root” when ordered from a catalog.

In Indiana, I can order ammunition online and have it delivered to my door.

In Indiana, a private to private gun sale is legal with a few restrictions/limitations but no registration or documentation required.

Recently I had an experience with my county health department. From past posts, some may know I am having issues with the legality of having chickens on my property. So, my wife and I wanted to open a roadside market stand on our property, to sell various things we grow, or produce. She wanted all i’s dotted and t’s crossed to not get any more issues. I went to the health department to get a better understanding of some of the regulations as I was unclear from a state vs. county level. I had already done extensive research, and it was more a matter of forms at this point. Going to an agency and asking what are the laws was a mistake. I will break them down on what I was told and the inconsistencies and bad misinformation I was given.

“I had to pay a $5 fee and complete a form to open a roadside stand for tracking purposes”. Completely false. No such requirement exists legally, and is not in county, local, or state requirements. I was told it was for the health department to “track if there are food illnesses”. Well if a person bought it from me, I am pretty sure they would know where it came from.

“I was not allowed to sell duck eggs, as they are not regulated”. This is only partially false. While duck eggs are not regulated by the Egg Board of the state, upon asking the Egg Board directly, and reading the laws, I am perfectly legal to sell duck eggs on my property from my flock.

“I had to submit my eggs to the State Egg Board for testing, and approval, along with fee of $25 and registration of chicken eggs” This is false, confirmed by Egg Board, and state law. If you sell on farm, or deliver from your farm, eggs that are produces on your farm you are exempted the certain “egg producers” laws of the state.

“Because I was opening a stand, that would function as a market, I had to comply with all the farmers market requirements”. Completely false. I can open a farm stand on my property and is NOT required by law to follow the same requirements as selling on a farmers market.

“If we sell jams or other canned good, I must submit them to the state for testing”. This is false, but there are some requirements as far a labeling and food practices.

“If we sell baked goods they have to be inspected, registered, and only certain items can be sold”.  Somewhat false. Again, there are some restrictions on the types of baked good that can be sold, but no inspections and testing necessary.

Senate Bill 179 covers some of this.
https://iga.in.gov/legislative/2014/bills/senate/179/

My local town council didn’t even know where the town boundaries were, since they were using a map from the 1970’s. Because no one had ever challenged the boundaries, or looked up the current relevant information.  Sometimes, it isn’t an issue until it becomes an issue, and people become complacent with the way things are.

Here is another example. My local town ordinance said I couldn’t have chickens. They had no website (I have now created one, that I own), and I asked for a copy of said ordinances in their entirety. Sometimes, one rule conflicts with another, and sometimes the laws are so old when they went into effect, that new laws trump them. I was told it would cost me $75. $75 for a copy of the laws I am required to follow? There are 75 pages and I was told that it is in their ordinances it is $1/page. So in order to get see the laws I am supposedly violating I would have to pay a $75 fee? I think not!! So I did my research and came across the Freedom of Information Act, and the State office of Information Access.  After a formal letter, a written request, and 2 complaints, the town attorney being involved, I am SUPPOSED to get my copy of the ordinances for $0.10/page sometime after June 15th. The original request was in MARCH.

http://www.in.gov/pac/

The point in all this is educating yourself. If something doesn’t sound right to you when it is spoken, do a little research. It helps to do the research ahead of time not that it is always applicable. But if you have an inkling that this is a controversial issue, gun carry, school requirements, farmers markets or whatever, be better educated. Sometimes it is that the “official” is misinformed themselves, sometimes, if is “just the way it has always been”, but that still doesn’t make it right. When referring to a particular law, name it IC 14-3-whatever, SB 179, 4th Amendment to the constitution. It allows to whomever you are speaking, that you have done a little research, and you are more informed than the common man. If you allow the “State” to trample on your rights then they believe you are OK with it, and will continue to do so.

In the defense of the back yard flock…

In our little RURAL town of Wingate, Indiana, population 267, surrounded by farms and farm land on all sides for 10 miles in any direction, of all things chickens are not allowed. We can have goats, pigs, horses, cows, llamas, alpaca, sheep, alligators, opossums, camels, and any number of other animals without limit, but not “poultry, weasels, chinchillas, ermine, mink, raccoons, muskrats or foxes”. Seems a bit odd grouping, but upon getting notice we were not allowed to have them, we went to the next town council to investigate why, and offered to help change the ordinances, as we had been part of the Marion Co ordinance revisions. The ordinances have been in place as long as anyone can remember. It took over 60 days, involvement of outside legal bodies just to get a copy of the section, of the ordinances, and still do not have a full copy with approvals and effective dates of the ordinances (originally requested in March).

So, due to our “discussions” with our local town council and the town ordinance stating we cannot have chickens, we have found it necessary to address the issues of keeping back yard chickens. Some of the points have been brought up, and we have already addressed them. As of now, the only argument that hasn’t been addressed is “We just don’t like to look at them”, to which we aren’t quite sure how to address. We are NOT a CAFO (confined animal feed operation) and have around 16 birds on 0.3 acres which is fenced in to keep birds in and larger predators out.  The birds have a coop which they stay in at night and are closed up until released in the morning. The birds free range most of the day. The birds are here to  help our organic orchard and vegetable garden stay pest free, reduce our kitchen waste, produce eggs, and are family pets.  If you are facing similar push back from friends, neighbors, relative, or government bodies, hopefully some of this information may help.

Noise

Typically the first complaint about chickens is the noise, and usually the rooster. You do not need to have a rooster to have a back yard flock. We do not have a rooster and haven’t had one for many years. I actually like the sound of a rooster, as it seems to belong on a farm, and a farm without a rooster is somewhat missing. Chickens (hens) will lay eggs without a rooster, but do gain a level of protection if a rooster is present. Roosters crow between 70 and 90 decibel. This is the range of a dog barking, baby crying, a diesel truck, driving in a car at 65mph, alarm clock, or the level what most people listen to music. The level is also dependant on humidity, proximity, and materials between the rooster and the listener. Example a privacy fence would significantly reduce the sound level compared to open area across pavement. As a comparison, human conversation is 60-70 decibel.

Laying hens do “talk” or cluck, and typically are loudest just after they lay an egg. The typical hen is only 65 decibel which is right in the middle of human conversation.  Most back yard flock owners have the nesting boxes, where the hens lay eggs, inside the coop. This is an additional level of sound barrier. Again, the sound will decrease with barriers, humidity, type of terrain (grass vs. concrete) and distance. The laying announcement lasts less than one minute and is only once per day, per chicken.

In our area, dogs  trucks, diesel semi trucks, farm machinery, J brakes on trucks, sirens from emergency vehicles, lawn mowers, grain elevators and dryers, alarms and notifications from grain elevators, motorcycles, school band instruments, and tractors are ALL noisier than our hens just to name a few for comparison.

decibel-frequency-chart
Click to enlarge
common_noise_levels_b29_sm
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Disease

When opponents of back yard flock state the reasons, often it is disease. The two most often cited are bird flu or avian flu, and salmonella. Bird flu has recently been brought back up in the news as a series of cases that have been found. Typically around 90% of all avian flu cases have been documented in CAFO operations and not the back yard flocks. The CAFO operations typically have lower immunities to the disease, are stressed, have poor diets, and are extremely densely stocked. Back yard flocks, especially free range operations have the benefit of wide and varied diets. The birds get fresh air, are allowed to develop natural immunities, are less densely stocked and have the benefit of less stress. Stress in both humans and animals have been linked to an increase in illnesses and diseases. The cases that have come up in back yard flocks, is a result of someone recently traveled from a CAFO or farm and bringing the illness with them on shoes or clothing.

Salmonella is more a food handling issue vs. a bird issue. Humans cannot contract salmonella from chickens by contact, it is a food borne illness.  The birds may have and carry salmonella but it is only by improper food handling or hand washing that humans contract the illness. The birds are not affected by it. So if someone is getting salmonella from being around chickens, eating the eggs, it is typically the humans fault. More and more cases of drug resistant strains are being found in CAFO operations due to the overuse of antibiotics when they are not necessary. In the 6 years we have been keeping hens, no-one in our family, or anyone receiving eggs from us, has gotten ill from salmonella. This is including children who as early as two years old are handling birds, eggs, and are in the area where the chickens live regularly.

To put things in perspective here are just a few of the diseases that are spread by human to human contact; influenza, common cold, HIV, AIDS, Meningitis, chickenpox (NOT CAUSED BY CHICKENS), mumps, measles, strep, tuberculosis, rubella, whooping cough, SARS, Cholera, Hepatitis, Polio, Rotavirus, Salmonella, Parasites, Chlamydia, Genital  warts, gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes, trichomoniasis, cytomegalovirus, mononucleosis, athletes foot, impetigo, warts, conjunctivitis, and MRSA. So to call a chicken a dirty animal spreading diseases well, it is the humans who are spreading diseases.

Pests

Recently we were told that chickens carry lice. This is not the case. Chickens can contract mites which are parasitic bugs that can live on the birds. Birds will typically rid the mites by giving themselves dust baths. We go an additional step and give them wood ash containers for their baths, and add diatomaceous earth. The wood ash is caustic and in the even the birds pick up mites, the caustic nature of the ash helps eliminate and keep the mites from returning. We add additional diatomaceous earth as an added plus. Typically birds that have an infestation of mites will lose feathers and can eventually cause death in the birds. The mites themselves do not cause the death but stress the birds to the point they become more susceptible to other diseases such as pneumonia. Humans typically carry TWO different types of mites typically living on eyelashes. Domesticated dogs also carry mites. Humans are the species that typically have lice, both body and head lice are common.

Chickens bring flies. Well chickens to not, bring the flies, the flies are a natural part of the waste cycle breaking down manure. Any animal that defecates in open area without burying it will attract flies. Dogs, horses, cats, rodents, even humans that have open fecal piles will attract flies. Good housekeeping or coop keeping will reduce the amount of flies present. Having deep litter in the coops, having the birds free range, and composting the deep litter regularly will not only keep the smell down but reduce the fly issues. There are also fly traps that can lower or eliminate any fly issues.

Chickens will attract predators, pests, and rodents. This again goes to good animal husbandry. We have a family dog who doesn’t bother the chickens and deters many predators from the property. Locking the chickens up at night in a predator proof coop also helps. In urban areas there are not as many predators as there are in the country just because of the amount of activity and people around. Most predators hunt at dusk or at night, and having a secure coop eliminates many of the issues.  As far as rodents chickens will kill and eat mice, snakes, and generally anything they can catch and take down. In addition they will eat ticks, fleas, grubs, grasshoppers, mosquitoes, sting bugs, Japanese beetles, squash bugs, and ants. Proper animal husbandry will further reduce any pest issues such as keeping feed secured in sealed containers, not having excess feed on the ground, and regular cleaning and maintenance of the coop.

Smell, Dirty

This goes back to animal husbandry. If you are keeping a clean coop then there should be no smell from birds. A 40 lb dog generates more manure (about ¾ pound) than ten chickens (two-thirds pounds of manure). Both are smelly, but the key is to keep the chicken manure from accumulating by composting. Composted chicken manure is valuable as a high-nitrogen fertilizer. Dog manure cannot be composted, and must be collected and sent to the landfill. So, 10 chickens produce manure that can be composted, returned to the soil for better plant health, while one 40 lb dog, the manure collected, and sent to a landfill. Which is the better situation?

Chickens are excellent garbage disposals. They will eat 95% of wastes generated from the family kitchen. Typically you are not to put meat, dairy, or fats into compost piles because they are slow to break down, smell as they decompose, and attract scavengers from bugs to animals. Chickens on the other hand will devour these materials like candy and in return give you eggs, meat, and fertilizer. We can reduce almost a whole bag of trash each month by allowing the chickens to have kitchen scraps and waste. This is a benefit to the landfill, and our trash doesn’t typically smell. To date, we have found 2 things our chickens won’t eat, olives and pickles, and this is over a 6 year period and a family of 6.

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Property values will decrease

Three is no assessor or realtor evidence to support this statement. In fact 7 out of 10 most desirable cities to live in allow back yard chickens. More and more communities are allowing chickens and as such is an attractant to new home buyers vs. a deterrent. Restrictive communities will lower property values more so than accepting ones. More and more people either want more control over the food they eat, are unhappy with the food in stores, want to reduce the grocery bill, or just want to be more self sufficient. The trend is on the rise and the communities who limit the freedoms of the people are turning more and more potential buyers away.

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Hopefully this answered some questions and alleviated some issues. Perhaps it will help you on your crusade to get back yard chickens into your area. The data in this article has been gathered from various sources from online, written publications, and personal experience.

Great article – Connecting with Customers

Here is a great article I had to share. It is from a good friend, mentor, local food producer and educator Darby Simpson from Simpson Family Farm and Darby Simpson Consulting.  This is for many who are looking for “better food” and a “better way to eat”  and can help put a feeling into words. It also goes along with a class I give on “Organic” gardening. Many people use the term “organic” to refer to so many things, and Darby has way to break it down.  Just using “Organic” really means nothing and the marketing companies have ruined it, such that consumers want “organic” and what they get is far from it. In the article you learn what to look for, and ways to find what in your mind “organic” means.  Darby has his own site where he consults, gives advice, and education.

Here it the link to the article Connecting with Customers

 

download

Local Farmer’s Market Calendar

Because there so many local producers, markets, and restaurants listed in the Indy Local Food Guide I am having to update the calendar 1st.  I am trying to color code the listings by area related to Indy. Unfortunately colors are only visible on my view at the moment.  Have no fear, there are addresses on most markets, and weblinks.

Here is a link to the current calendar and is updated regularly.

Blue = North Side

Red = Downtown

Yellow = South

Purple = East

Green = West

Hamilton County Local Resources Added

Today I add the Hamilton County local resources list from Indylocalfood.org. This list and the calendar couldn’t be possible without the local food guide.

14 – Producers/Shops – Balanced Harvest Farm, Blackhawk Winery, Feel Good Farm, Full Hands Farm, Grabow Orchard & Bakery, Harvestland Farm of Aspire Indiana, Local Forks Foods LLC, Newbys Farm, NuJac Garden, The Sustainable Life, Victory Acres, Wild’s Apple Farm, Wilson Farm

3 – Restaurants – Grabow Bakery, Union Brewing Company, Wilson Farms Deli & Bakery

4 – Shops – Local Folks Foods , Urban Ladle, Blackhawk Winery, Union Brewing Company

5 – Markets – Fisher Farmer’s Market,  Noblesville Farmers Market, Saxony Market, Sheridan Farmers Market, Westfield Farmers Market

1- CSA Victory Farms CSA

Here is a list and links to each site or Facebook Page

The Calendar has been updated for all the Markets

 

If there are more places I haven’t listed please let me know. I am in the process of going through the Local Good Guide and posting a section at a time. Use the Contact Us page if you are a farm, business, CSA, or restaurant and want to be added.

 

 

New local resources added thanks to Indy Local Food Guide

While presenting this year at Earth Day (the rain was a bummer) I picked up the Local Food Guide put out by IndyLocalFood.org and lots of new places to add to our weblisting and calendar. Stay tuned as I go through the book and update the site, and calendar. You can download the guide and have more resources than is listed on our site. I am only listing markets, CSA, shops, and produces that have a website. Today I added Boone County and a few suggested posts that came in from the website, thanks for the suggestions.

Local resources List

Calendar of Markets

5 New producers added – KG Acres Farms and featherworks, Moody’s, Salem Farms on Hunt Club, Valentine Hill Farm, Dunbar Heritage Farms

1 new shop – Moody’s Meats

3 new markets – Carmel, Zionsville, and Farm to Fork

1 new category listing, – Multiple locations – if a business has multiple locations available.

2 New CSA – Valentine Hill, and Salem Farms on Hunt Club

These additions couldn’t be made possible without Indy Local Food Guide

Local Farmers Markets, resources, and calendar

Farmer’s Market season is about to start. I have created a list of local Farmers Markets, Restaurants serving locally sources foods, CSA (Consumer supported agriculture), and locally sources retail stores. It is an early list but would love input and add more as people share with me. use the Contact Us page or email (without spaces) wolfbeachfarms @ gmail.com

Locally Sourced List

Local Market Calendar

Looking for local markets, stores, and restaurants

I manage several different sites and pages and am in the process of creating a local database of farmers markets, pick your own sites, restaurants who use local produce and meats, and related locations that either produce locally or retail locally produced items. I need your help. I could spend weeks searching online and still would never get as many listed if I were to enlist your help. Many of you have local spots you personally know of, support, run, or owned by you. Some have websites, some have facebook pages, and some have no online presence.

My goal is to have a calendar of all the markets in the area. Believe it or not there is a market running every day of the week, usually multiple. This hopefully will allow more people access to more local food if they know where they are and when they run.

Support local businesses to buy from local producers. I would ideally like to have several categories, restaurants, food retail, nursery and plant stock, and other retail (soaps, wool works, crafts, etc.)

What I need from you. If you could e-mail me wolfbeachfarms @ gmail.com (please remove the spaces). or use the contact us page and send me links, or names, or dates/times/locations of the above places. The links and calendars will be updated as I get the information. Here is the start for market pages and an interactive calendar.

Thanks in advance!

Rick

Seed, seedling and plant exchange-sale

A friend had an idea about how every year he always starts way more seeds than he needs. Just as a precaution to make sure all his vegetable beds are filled. Well, what to do with all the seeds that germinate that you won’t need? Not enough to sell at a farmers market, IF you can get in to sell. no time to sit at home waiting on people to show up to pick up or buy. Hate to throw a way, or compost. What to do?

A plant and seed exchange and sale.  This is the 1st of hopefully an annual event. Idally we would like to have spots set up on the North, South, East, West and Downtown sides of Indy and outlying areas too. If you want to host an event like this contact us.  I thought it would be nice to have one every weekend from mid April to end of May each weekend at a different part of  the area. If you don’t sell out in week one, move to spot two on the opposite side of town.

I will have a “booth” there and talk permaculture, maybe a few plants we have for sale. Stop by and say hi.

More information at the link here.

Here are the details.

Do you start more seeds than you need? Do you hate to just get rid of them? Don’t. Sell them, trade the, exchange them. Are you wanting to market unique plants and seeds but no place to sell them? Do you need to thin your plants, and hate to compost or trash them? Sell them. Do you have a side business selling plants, plant starts, or even seeds? Come out and sell your stock. It is not too late to start seeds for this event. Some people cannot start seeds, some don’t have the space, and some don’t have the materials. Whatever the reason, we are looking for vendors. Only plants, roots, seeds, etc. at this time. No animals or animal products (except maybe manure/compost). Worms, worm casting, and Black Soldier Fly approved for sale.

This is the 1st, but hopefully not the last, Seed, seedling, and plant sale-exchange.  We are meeting in the church parking lot, and there is additional parking at Perry Park (adjacent to the church), and across the street at Douglas MacArthur elementary school. 

Vendors or sellers will pay $20 for a parking lot size space, and if not muddy a lawn space behind the space. All money generated from space sales will go to Cub Scout Pack 120. There will be no power, Wi-Fi, or utilities available. There is a limit of 20 vendors. Contact Rick at wolfbeachfarms@gmail.com 317-997-5554 to get a spot (Paypal, CC, Cash, accepted for spot payment, all payments minus mandatory electronic transaction fees will go to the Pack).

Buyers are Free

Vendors or sellers may charge, collect, trade, exchange, as they see fit for their plants, seeds, trees etc. Some may be able to take Credit and debit cards with their smart devices, some may only take cash. So plan accordingly. 

Sale 10-2pm; setup 9-10am; take-down 2-3pm, so you can setup then go park the car and have more available space. Or, sell out of your trunk.

The Boy Scouts will also be selling food and drinks. Cash only please. 

If you RSVP your are RSVPing as a buyer. Use the email listed to secure your spot as a vendor.

Come on out, support the Scouts, and get your garden going. Buy local.  

The Church and the Pack are not affiliated with any vendor, and are not responsible for any transactions, accidents, or disputes that arise from the plant/seed sale. 

Growing and teaching sustainable and healthy food production