Indy Rezone Update

I really appreciate Sherri for gathering the information and keeping up on this. I am posting for her to reach more people. Many have thought this has died. IT HAS NOT My personal opinion is that the powers behind Rezone want to slip this under the table and get it passed ASAP. In the meetings I have attended there has been few in favor of the rezoning efforts. Most homesteaders and back yard flock and animal owners are adamantly opposed to it. 

Can you please spread this Indy Rezone Update? Thanks. 
 
The time to act is NOW!  The Economic and Metropolitan development committee will “discuss” Indy Rezone for the third and quite possibly last time this next Monday Sept. 21. at 5:30, Room 260 of the City County building. 
 
Why is discuss in quotes?  Because so far there has been little to no actual discussion.  July 27, Committee Chair Leroy Robinson made it clear that they really didn’t want any comments that day, they were just introducing the proposal. Aug. 31, the meeting began at 5:30, at 8:39 when they finally got to Indy Rezone (the last topic to be discussed), most people has already left, including many of the councilors on the committee AND they said we needed to be out of the building (a school) by 9:00, or 9:10 at the latest. Oh, and did I mention before discussion happened there was a presentation?
 
Honestly, I am tired, frustrated and discouraged.  I’m just a homeschooling mom.  I don’t blog – I don’t even have a facebook account so I most certainly don’t have a following and I don’t have much influence on anyone other than my family. It seems like Indy Rezone is an inevitability. Most people have no idea it is happening or that there will be MANY additional zoning regulations or they just don’t care. At the meetings there have been LOTS of people opposing other items on the agenda, but hardly any with concerns over Indy Rezone. 
 
 Once again, I ask, “How in the world does creating more ordinances on Urban farming make us more sustainable?”. Why does an Urban garden on an abandoned lot need soil testing? Why must it be officially registered with the city or have 36 inch high fences– and what inner city neighborhoods have the money to do those things?  That is one example.
 
Another example?  You WILL NOT be able to have Guineas or Turkeys. You are limited to Chickens, Ducks, Quail and pigeons and can only have 12 unless you get a special license. You will be limited to 8 rabbits. NO intact male goats or sheep, and you can only have 3-4 depending on lot size. 
 
The thing I have wanted to say at these meetings and have yet to be able to say – Many ordinances are petty and restrictive and limited in their ability to be enforced. Such as (drum roll) Indy Rezone.  Do you know the only time code enforcement comes? When someone complains!! If you have an ornery complaining neighbor they will be in your neighborhood often. 
 
The new projected date for Indy Rezone to go into effect is April 1, 2016 – to see how you can find out more about Indy Rezone scroll down to the end. 
 
Two main points of action:
1. Attend the committee meeting Mon. Sept. 21 at 5:30 PM in Rm 260 -and if at all possible be willing to speak – you may only have 2 minutes – arrive early if possible and make sure you sign the list saying you want to speak. Even if you come late and don’t get on the list, you should be able to speak but it is good for them to have a starting place for the number of people interested in speaking. 
 
2. E-mail and /or call the counselors on the committee ASAP, let them know why you are unhappy.  It seems like the best way to hope it will be at least scanned through is not a running paragraph, but a numbered list of your objections. The contact info below is from http://www.indy.gov/eGov/Council/Committees/Pages/metro.aspx 
 
Leroy Robinson – Chair – (317)329-0923– leroy.robinson@indy.gov
Will Gooden 317-319-4398 william.gooden@indy.gov
Mary Moriarty Adams 317-359-6940 mmadams@iquest.net
 
Note presentations from the previous 2 committee meetings and  scroll down to bottom of page for the livestock license link 
 
  1. Agricultural uses, Farmers Market, Garden as Primary use (Pg. 483-486)
  2. Personal Garden, Personal Livestock (pgs. 526-528)
  3. Personal Livestock License Draft:  http://www.indy.gov/eGov/City/DMD/Planning/Zoning/ordinances/Indy%20Rezone%20Docs/Personal%20Livestock%20License%20061715.pdf
  4. The only thing that would be considered “Grandfathering in” what you currently have/are doing- Applications and Nonconformities begins pg. 118.
We will try to answer any questions to the best of our ability!
Sherri – hmsklnflybaby@gmail.com (but I will be without internet til Monday – a true retreat so hubby may be a better bet!!)

DIY Rabbit tracor

To give our buns more open air time, exposure to fresh greens, we decided to make a rabbit tractor. So far, they have all spent time in it and loved being out in the open. This will eventually be used to house the grow outs until freezer camp day. I took several designs I saw and combined what I liked, and used materials I had available. If you click on the images you can enlarge them for more details.

I had a small section of chain-link fence left over from another project. This looked like a good base, and size for the tractor.

We had some extra tubs laying around. This looked good to make a hiding hole, shade for them.

Using a jigsaw I cut a small opening into one side.

Left over 1×3 lumber from the demo of the office (the inside of our tiny house). I chose an A frame to minimize materials needed, and weight. And I only had 2 rolls of wire and didn’t want to go to store. The frame is screwed together with deck screw we had from another project. The base is made of treated 2x4x8. Left over from building the greenhouse attached to the building.  I happen to have 10 feet of chain link fence, and the 2×4 was 8 feet long. Bonus, no cutting.

20150910_105932

2 rolls of left over 1/2″x1″ welded wire. This was going to be a grow out pen in the coop, but we liked the tractor idea better. The wire is stapled to the frame.

Because I was working alone, and needed to stretch the chain-link tipping the tractor on edge was the easiest thing to do.

This is metal fastening tape, found in the plumbing section.  I use this stuff all over the place. Works great. It is woven between the chain-links and secured to the bottom of the tractor frame. This way I can move rabbits and everythign without ever having to get them out. It also prevents them from digging holes, and protection from predators.

I hinged the whole side of the tractor. This allows easier access to the rabbits inside. If I opened from one end, someone (not me) would have to crawl in there to get rabbits.

The door is kept closed with bungee cords connected to the bottom chain links and the wire mesh on the sides. It is tight enough that the rabbits or predators cannot open it. The pet litter box is actually a waterer.  I drilled the bottom and made a shelf for it to sit on.

20150913_123335

The hole in the bottom is connected to rabbit nipples (tubing, connectors, and nipples available though Amazon)

20150917_094336

I had all the materials on hand, and made do with what was available. If I had to make it again and buying materials it would probably cost around $60-80 and that is a high estimate. You can scrounge materials from various places or buy used materials.

 

Lumber can be from used pallets = free

Cubbie can be made from Rubbermaid containers from goodwill  <$3 Goodwill. You can also find hinges at goodwill, Habitat for Humanity Restore. or asset Recycling.

Instead of watering nipples you can use watering dishes/bowls/tupperware/etc. = free

Wire may need to be purchased, but if not overnighting rabbits can use chicken wire. Check craigslist.

Many places like Habitat, and Asset Recycling will have sections of chain-link. you really don’t need it, but we will be overnighting the rabbits in it, and ease of moving them.