Breeding Rams

We are breeding our own sheep and have selected the best characteristics of animals we would like to pass on to future generations.  One goal we would like to accomplish is to create a hybrid sheep with all the desired characteristics. Hardiness of the Shetland who are parasite resistant, have a more goatlike diet of browse, and nice horn structure; multiple lambing and fiber like the Finn; and size, and fiber like the Rambouillet.  This “ideal” sheep for us would be a hardy stock, producing multiple offspring, and excellent fiber quality, and excellent meat source. The one characteristic missing which would be the icing on the cake is to add in milking genetics so that we would have a three fold purpose animal.

Olaf

Olaf is a full Shetland ram. Shetlands are listed as “recovering” with The Livestock Conservancy. He was purchased as a lamb in April 2016. He has fathered several children in 2017 lambing season already. He is broad chested, has very nice horns, and a nice fiber.

Father to:

  • Domino – 2017
  • Snowflake – 2017
  • Brenna – 2017
  • Jupiter – 2017
  • Neptune – 2017

 

Olaf 2017

Chocolate’

Chocolate’ is a full Shetland ram as well. Shetlands are listed as “recovering” with The Livestock Conservancy. He was purchased as a lamb in April 2016. He has fathered several children in 2017 lambing season already. He is broad chested a nice fiber, and is sticking around because of his personality. He has an issue of his horns curling towards his eyes, but as of now, has not impacted them.

Father to:

  • Midget – 2017
  • Pluto – 2017
  • Tiny – 2017
Chocolate’ 2017

Mocha

Mocha is full registered Finn. He came to us to retire, but still has some game left in him. He has fathered several lambs in the 2017 spring season. He has very nice fiber, and a very docile personality.

Father to:

  • Wee-Man – 2017
  • Laura – 2017
  • Taz – 2017
  • Pixie – 2016
Mocha 2016

Wee-Man

Wee Man is a full Finn with a father of  Mocha and mother Mattie Wee-Man was born in Spring 2017 here on the farm.

 

Wethers

Jupiter

While he is not a breeding ram he will be remaining on the farm as a pet and fiber animal. He was the smaller of twins born on the farm and his mother rejected him. Brandie bottle fed him in the house and he lived with us for about 4 months. We are not quite sure if he realizes he is a sheep, because he sure acts like a dog. He chases cats, birds, rabbits, and will run to the driveway when the dogs start barking at cars, or when deliveries are made. He was banded to reduce his testosterone and make him more docile as he gets larger. Jupiter is a full Shetland.

Wee feeding Jupiter when a baby
He took over the dogs bed
Snuggles with Daisy on the couch
Jupiter guarding the front hill. He thought he heard something.

 

Growing and teaching sustainable and healthy food production

%d bloggers like this: