Goats

We have multiple species of both meat and dairy goats. Unlike the breeding program with the sheep, we do not have as high aspirations for the goats. We are cross breeding to see milk production, temperament, colorings, body structure, and hardiness. While we do milk the goats, they are both pets and working animals helping maintain pastures and clean new areas. The end goal with the goats is to be able to have a traveling herd that will clean client’s property of brush and overgrown areas in an environmentally friendly way.

We do milk the milking breeds, however allow the kids to stay with mom and on mom exclusively for 8 weeks. Then we separate mom and kids overnight, milk in the morning, and allow the kids to free nurse as long as mom allows during the day. Some moms allow more pampering than others of their kids. Each doe lines up at night to be separated as they get treats at night, and run to the milking stand in the morning again, where more treats await them.

We drink the raw milk, and make ice cream, cheese, and other milk products from the milk we get. We even made our own milking machine, and here is how we did it.

Bucks

Todd

Todd has multiple names as he has quite the personality, Todd the Toggenburg, The Todd (after and engineering friend), Toddy, Toddy too Hottie, and Handsome Todd. Todd is full registered Toggenburg. He has a long coat and good frame. unfortunately he was disbudded prior to coming to us and has scours that get knocked off occasionally and leaves his with a copper colored head when the blood dries. Just adds to his handsomeness. 2017 was The Year of The Todd, so all the does ended up being with Todd and he fathered quite a few kids.

Father to:

  • He-Man – 2017
  • Duke – 2017
  • Turk – 2017
  • Lovey – 2017
  • Dovey – 2017

The Todd – Dad
The Todd – Dad

Bucky

Bucky just born on the farm
Bucky 2017

Father to:

  • Punkin – 2017
  • June-Bug – 2017

Does

Adelle

Adele is our oldest goat. She is an Alpine a dairy breed.  She came to us pregnant and had Bucky in August 2016. Her previous family had a full plate going to school and working, and wanted her to go to a good home with the other milking does.  She is used to being queen bee, so we will have to see how her and Ms Blue get along. Might be a battle for the crown. We changed her name, because Rick couldn’t remember it, and we thought more fitting.

Mother to:

  • Bucky – 2016

Fergie

Fergie is a Toggenburg goat a dairy breed. We again changed her name.  She has been our escape artist, and we have had to constantly make improvements on the goat palace.  She really doesn’t go anywhere, but just wants to be by us and the other goats. Fergie gave birth to Duke and Turk in spring 2017 and is a fairly good milker. Fergie gives over one quart a day, only milking once a day. She has the potential to give over 1/2 gallon per day.

Mother to:

  • Duke -2017
  • Turk – 2017

Fergie – Mom’s udder

Blue

Blue aka Blue Holland  is an Oberhasli goat a dairy breed. Oberhasli is listed as “recovering” by The Livestock Conservancy.  A friend needed to reduce her herd, and blue who was originally supposed to be a milking goat, was unable to become pregnant. She found a home here.  She is a brush cleaner, pasture restoration, and companion animal for other goats.  She is also our yard goat. She does not require a fence, stays within 20 ft of people at all times, or just hangs out on the deck/yard around the house. Blue unexpectedly gave birth to a buck which didn’t survive in July 2016. We were told she wasn’t able to get pregnant. She surprised us all. Blue was an excellent milker and was our 1st goat we hand milked. She was added into the breeding program with no real goals, since there may be pregnancy issues.

1st members of our mowing crew (John Deere, and Blue Holland aka Bluebell).
Blue says she would like to come inside too!

Scarlet

Next we have Scarlet aka Scarlet “mow” Hanson. Scarlet and her twin daughters (She-Ra and Oreo) are Myotonic Fainting Goats. Myotonic goats are a meat breed. These ladies will be part of the breeding program . All three are registered goats. Despite the name we haven’t seen much fainting. We lost Oreo in 2016

Mother to:

  • Oreo – 2016
  • She-Ra – 2016
  • Lovey -2017
  • Dovey – 2017
The girls all lining up to meet Toddy
Scarlet

Lilly

Lilly (aka Lilly Bug) also came from the same farm as Fergie, Adele, and Piper. She is an Oberhasli and listed as “recovering” with The Livestock Conservancy.  Lilly has been an excellent mother as she gave birth to June-Bug (because mom is Lilly bug) in Spring 2017 and an excellent milker. Lilly gives over one quart a day, only milking once a day. She has the potential to give over 1/2 gallon per day.

Mother to:

June-Bug – 2017

Lilly
Lilly, Piper, and John
Lilly and her doeling June-Bug 2017

Lilly is part of the Itty Bitty Teat-y Committee.  The has very small teats which make it difficult to hand milk her. Having a milking machine has made it much nicer. We built it ourselves, here is how we did it with parts list.

Piper

Piper and Lilly also came from the same farm as Fergie and Adele. Piper is an Oberhasli and Lamancha cross. Piper has very small ears. Piper has been a great mom giving birth to He-Man and Punkin in Spring 2017. She is also a great milker. Piper gives over one quart a day, only milking once a day. She has the potential to give over 1/2 gallon per day.

Mother to:

  • He-Man – 2017
  • Punkin – 2017

Piper

She-Ra

She-Ra is a registered Myotonic Fainting goat. They are a meat breed of goat. Like their name suggests they do faint when they get excited or scared. Myotonic is listed as “recovering” on The Livestock Conservancy List. She-Ra was pregnant in 2016-2017 but lost both babies. This may be due to her smaller size and larger size of the buck (Todd)

the twins, Oreo and Shera

Nelly

Nelly was a purchased goat in late winter 2017, she is a Nubian a dairy goat. She was sold as a bottle baby but from the day she came home she never took to a bottle. She had a herd brother but died early on and we didn’t want her to be lonely in the barn. Wee took her in and the two of them went EVERYWHERE together. She slept in the house, they snuggled and watched TV. Wee took the responsibility and did everythign by herself. Nelly didn’t know how to goat at 1st because she had been treated like a dog. We nicknamed her the Gog (goat dog). After a while when she was big enough she integrated with the herd and learned how to goat. She likes to hang out with Blue, Todd, and Ma!.

afternoon snack
teaching h ow to play fruit ninja
House goat

Ma!

Ma! came to us as a rehome. Her previous family had lots of beef cows and Ma! was more of a pet. Well when the gows switched from hay to grain Ma! gorged herself too many times, developed a weight issue and almost died. The family didn’t have any other goats and no where to put her where there was not grain, so the looked for a new home for her. Ma! is Boer meat bread, although Ma! is now part of the family and breeding and brush cleaning is in her future.  Upon a overall inspection of goat health we discovered Ma! has four teats. This is apparently not uncommon in Boer goats. So, her nickname now is “Ma! The Four Teatied Goat”.

Wee said Ma! was just too dirty, and needed a good brushing.

Punkin

He-Man and Punkin are in interesting pair in that we think He-Man is the offspring of Todd and Piper and Punkin is the offspring of Bucky and Piper. This is not uncommon and we had both bucks in with the herd. We didn’t believe Bucky was able to breed yet, but we may have been wrong.

Gytha likes to “play dead” if it means you will come out and give her attention.

Lovey

Lovey is named for the two heart shaped spots she has on her back half. She is 1/2 Toggenburg and 1/2 Myotonic Fainting.

Dovey

Dovey is almost always with her sister and can be identified by the missing heart shapes in her markings. She is 1/2 Toggenburg and 1/2 Myotonic Fainting.

June-bug

June-Bug and her mom Lilly

Hopie

Hopie came to us as a rescue. We were planning on helping one of the Aunties load goats for a friend of hers, and when we showed up, two of the woman’s dogs had mauled Hopie pretty bad. Deep wounds around neck, head, and she was left in the summer sun to die. We brought her home and Brandie rescued her. Even flushing maggots out of her wounds. Hopie had mad a fairly good recovery, she still walks with her head tilted, and is skittish, but after a year will allow you to touch her, and approach her slowly. She is no longer afraid of our dogs. She has integrated into the herd and usually has 1 or 2 of the older female goats she likes to bond with Ma! and Blue.

Hopie after dog attack

Wethers

In an effort to grow our mowing crew of brushcutters we decided to keep all of our 2017 spring bucks and wether them. They will have a job of eating down brush to make new pastures for grass loving animals, and retake overgrown pastures.

Norman

Norman is a Pygora goat (Pygmy Angora) nothing pygmy about him. His wool is long and soft. He needed a new home and previous owners were moving. We needed more brush cleaners. Norman provides wool, brush cleaning, pasture restoration, and companionship for other goats.  Norman is fixed so no more wool babies from him. J has adopted him as HIS goat. Strangely, only J can pet Norman.

Norman in his prime

The Three Amigos (Ned, Dusty, and Lucky)

The Three Amigos were taken in because their farm was downsizing and they were pets at their previous home. They were spoiled and fat, and because they were spoiled they didn’t integrate well with the herd and had to be separated into their own area. Well, they didn’t like a single pasture or space we put them in, no fence configurations kept them in. They constantly escaped and started being destructive to plants and trees we were cultivating as well as killing a pregnant doe we had.  Re-homing didn’t work as not many wanted problematic goats that didn’t get along with others. If a solution wasn’t reached they were destined for freezer camp. The problem is, we would introduce them to the herd as a group, and almost gang mentality they would team up against the other goats. We instead took one at a time and allowed them to integrate separately. This solution worked and they have gained a place in the herd. Dusty seemed to be the ring leader and sometimes needs attitude correcting and put back in his place. He is also the loudest crybaby of the group.

 

Ned aka White Boy

Ned 2017

 

Lucky aka Black Boy

 

 

Dusty aka Brown Boy

 

Duke

Duke and Turk are full blooded Toggs and sons of Fergie and Todd. They were for sale as in tact boys but as they got older we decided to band them and make them part of the mowing crew. Duke is much larger than his brother and usually has a red collar. Duke and Turk are both lighter in coloring than He-man.

Duke and Turk at 4 weeks old.

Turk

Duke and Turk are full blooded Toggs and sons of Fergie and Todd. They were for sale as in tact boys but as they got older we decided to band them and make them part of the mowing crew.

Duke and Turk at 4 weeks old.

He-man

He-Man and Punkin are in interesting pair in that we think He-Man is the offspring of Todd and Piper and Punkin is the offspring of Bucky and Piper. This is not uncommon and we had both bucks in with the herd. We didn’t believe Bucky was able to breed yet, but we may have been wrong. All three boys out of Todd Duke, Turk, and He-Man look almost exactly alike. Duke is the biggest, tuTurk in the middle and He-Man is the darkest colored.

Gytha likes to “play dead” if it means you will come out and give her attention.

 

Growing and teaching sustainable and healthy food production

%d bloggers like this: