Category Archives: DIY

Aquatic Design Open House

Here is a great chance to meet new like minded people, ask questions, get some deals, get great ideas, and generally have a fun time. I will be presenting a class, have Q&A, so ask about aquaponics, ask about permaculture. ask just about anything. it is FREE

Aquatic Design and Supply

August 8th 10:30 AM -7PM

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You have to fight for your right…

Back in the 80’s and 90’s Beastie Boys were the bad boys on the radio fighting for their right to party. More and more today it seems as though you have to fight for your rights for anything.  From your constitutional rights, to your civil rights, to your rights within the laws, your rights are being trampled on, ignored, and violated. Why is it this way? Much has to do with people’s own ignorance. They simply do not know their rights and let people tell them what their rights are or how they are to be treated. If you are tired of this like I was, get informed, get educated, and begin flexing your rights. I live in Indiana, in the USA. So my particular rights may be different than someone in Texas, California, or Australia. But the baseline message remains the same. Know your rights and know the laws. I want to state I am NOT A LAWYER, and I am not giving legal advice, other than educate yourself.

OK, OK, you say know the laws but there are literally tens of thousands of laws all at different levels; International laws (Across country boarders), Federal laws (across state lines), State Laws (within your state), County Laws (County within state), Town/City laws or ordinances, and sometimes HOA (Home Owners Association) for your individual neighborhood.  Start with some basic ones and branch out to what matters to you. I will give some examples along the way that I have come across in the last 6 years since I work up and begin to take back my life.

Constitution

The US Constitution

 

While I could probably give you examples of how our federal government has violated every single one of these, it doesn’t make it right. It takes a lawsuit to correct the violations, and that can even go all the way to the Supreme Court.  Every American should read it, and at least have a paper copy somewhere available to them. Some examples are in the news lately, with the Executive Orders being signed to bypass Congress, to the Debts we incur as a country in the Federal Deficit, to declaring war on other countries, even if you do not call it a “war”. Calling something an “armed conflict” on foreign soil is nothing more than a lie so they can violate the law.

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html

https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution

Rights

The Bill of Rights

The Bill of Rights are the first 10 amendments to the constitution. These are not laws for the people, but are supposed to be laws for the government to protect your rights as a people, as a citizen. EVERY one of these rights has been violated by our government, and sometimes regularly. From The Patriot Act, to No Knock Raids, to “Protest Areas” marked by police. This again must be brought up through the court system. If you are working poor, or just poor, unless some lawyer agrees to pursue your case on your behalf pro-bone (without charge) to make a name, or to do the right thing, changes are the government from federal to local will keep stepping on your rights. It will not be until We The People stand up and say enough before a change will happen. Give you some examples in my own life.

A neighbor has an issue with her next door neighbor. He comes out yelling profanities at her for a past issue. He is on his property, she is on hers. She finally has enough and yells back, she doesn’t appreciate it. Cops show up and say they will take her to jail if they get called back out. She came to me and I explained, I am not a lawyer, but Your Freedom of Speech is protected, as is your neighbors. The cops can’t arrest you for this. She then explained the cop asked permission to enter her house. She refused, but again, Right to Freedom from Searches without cause.

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights.html

https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/billofrights

Protestors against the BLM (Bureau of Land Management) out in Nevada, along with the BLM issue with the Bundy’s Ranch in general, is another issue recently. Police told protesters that they could only protest in a certain area, and when they did not comply they were arrested. This is against 1st Amendment, Freedom of Speech. BLM overstepped their authority vs. State rights in the 10th Amendment.

You will also see the 10th Amendment coming up more as States overrule Federal programs and laws. Powers not granted to the federal government shall remain with the state. From FDA “Right to Try” laws, to Marijuana, to gun rights, to NSA spying, to Common Core school requirements, lots of states are stepping away from Federal laws, and mandates. Learn more about the 10th amendment imitative below

http://tenthamendmentcenter.com/

If there is a particular issue you have on your mind, or you have come across research it. Is it Federal. State, County Local etc. I can’t go into all the laws I have researched lately but I can go into some that opened my eyes or confirmed something I held to be true.

Indiana Constitution

Indiana Laws or IC Codes

In Indiana, once you have your “Permit to Carry” you may open or conceal carry a firearms with certain limitations on location such as schools, federal buildings and property, casino, on planes and a few others. Texas is making a big deal that they now can open carry. Well, we have been doing that for a long time. Now I know the “school” was loosely defined and that citizens attending colleges wanted the right to protect themselves. Since this didn’t impact me at the time I didn’t dig deeper. But here it is again, if you do not like how the law is, then know your rights and do something about it.

In Indiana, it is perfectly legal to carry a Viking axe in public, along with long blades, switch blades, folding blades. The only thing I believe is illegal is throwing stars, and knives that have projectile blades that separate from the handle.

In Indiana, the homeschooling rule is that the minimum requirement is 180 days of education, and kids must be enrolled in formal education by age 7. That is it, no testing, no curriculum approval, no home visits, no teacher approval. You can even make their own diploma. I was “told” I could not do this, I needed a letter to the principal, I needed to file with the state, I needed to make the take the ISEP (Standardized testing). All a bunch of lies. I dug deeper and educated myself on what was the law.

In Indiana, if your kids attend public school, they are not required to participate in standardized testing (ISTEP). You as a parent, or guardian can opt out. I was told they are REQUIRED to take this test, and pass in order to graduation. This is utter fiction, and false. If you get a bunch of negative attention to the student (extra work, ostracized, or punished) you can file a lawsuit against the school, as this IS against the students rights.

In Indiana, an agent of the State (Someone employed by a government agency) may not enter your property without a warrant. This includes CPS, police, health inspectors etc. There are cases such as probable cause, and Building inspectors for “Emergency Safety”. Again I am not a lawyer, but this has held for my own experiences, more than I would like to have had.

I may not sell plants across state lines here in Indiana without regulation, permitting, and inspection. You cannot ship plants in soil through the mail system without regulations. This is why most places come “bare root” when ordered from a catalog.

In Indiana, I can order ammunition online and have it delivered to my door.

In Indiana, a private to private gun sale is legal with a few restrictions/limitations but no registration or documentation required.

Recently I had an experience with my county health department. From past posts, some may know I am having issues with the legality of having chickens on my property. So, my wife and I wanted to open a roadside market stand on our property, to sell various things we grow, or produce. She wanted all i’s dotted and t’s crossed to not get any more issues. I went to the health department to get a better understanding of some of the regulations as I was unclear from a state vs. county level. I had already done extensive research, and it was more a matter of forms at this point. Going to an agency and asking what are the laws was a mistake. I will break them down on what I was told and the inconsistencies and bad misinformation I was given.

“I had to pay a $5 fee and complete a form to open a roadside stand for tracking purposes”. Completely false. No such requirement exists legally, and is not in county, local, or state requirements. I was told it was for the health department to “track if there are food illnesses”. Well if a person bought it from me, I am pretty sure they would know where it came from.

“I was not allowed to sell duck eggs, as they are not regulated”. This is only partially false. While duck eggs are not regulated by the Egg Board of the state, upon asking the Egg Board directly, and reading the laws, I am perfectly legal to sell duck eggs on my property from my flock.

“I had to submit my eggs to the State Egg Board for testing, and approval, along with fee of $25 and registration of chicken eggs” This is false, confirmed by Egg Board, and state law. If you sell on farm, or deliver from your farm, eggs that are produces on your farm you are exempted the certain “egg producers” laws of the state.

“Because I was opening a stand, that would function as a market, I had to comply with all the farmers market requirements”. Completely false. I can open a farm stand on my property and is NOT required by law to follow the same requirements as selling on a farmers market.

“If we sell jams or other canned good, I must submit them to the state for testing”. This is false, but there are some requirements as far a labeling and food practices.

“If we sell baked goods they have to be inspected, registered, and only certain items can be sold”.  Somewhat false. Again, there are some restrictions on the types of baked good that can be sold, but no inspections and testing necessary.

Senate Bill 179 covers some of this.
https://iga.in.gov/legislative/2014/bills/senate/179/

My local town council didn’t even know where the town boundaries were, since they were using a map from the 1970’s. Because no one had ever challenged the boundaries, or looked up the current relevant information.  Sometimes, it isn’t an issue until it becomes an issue, and people become complacent with the way things are.

Here is another example. My local town ordinance said I couldn’t have chickens. They had no website (I have now created one, that I own), and I asked for a copy of said ordinances in their entirety. Sometimes, one rule conflicts with another, and sometimes the laws are so old when they went into effect, that new laws trump them. I was told it would cost me $75. $75 for a copy of the laws I am required to follow? There are 75 pages and I was told that it is in their ordinances it is $1/page. So in order to get see the laws I am supposedly violating I would have to pay a $75 fee? I think not!! So I did my research and came across the Freedom of Information Act, and the State office of Information Access.  After a formal letter, a written request, and 2 complaints, the town attorney being involved, I am SUPPOSED to get my copy of the ordinances for $0.10/page sometime after June 15th. The original request was in MARCH.

http://www.in.gov/pac/

The point in all this is educating yourself. If something doesn’t sound right to you when it is spoken, do a little research. It helps to do the research ahead of time not that it is always applicable. But if you have an inkling that this is a controversial issue, gun carry, school requirements, farmers markets or whatever, be better educated. Sometimes it is that the “official” is misinformed themselves, sometimes, if is “just the way it has always been”, but that still doesn’t make it right. When referring to a particular law, name it IC 14-3-whatever, SB 179, 4th Amendment to the constitution. It allows to whomever you are speaking, that you have done a little research, and you are more informed than the common man. If you allow the “State” to trample on your rights then they believe you are OK with it, and will continue to do so.

Rabbit watering system for freezing climates

This is our first year with rabbits over winter and we were not sure how to handle the freezing temps and water. We did a little research and most people either used heater bottles, or changed the crocks our 2 times a day. We were not going to spend the money for heated bottles (around $40 each) and the reviews of them were questionable. We were doing the crocks 2 times a day but that meant we HAD to be home and could not travel to our small house project on weekends. I needed something to fit my needs. I stumbled upon a video of a guy who had a similar issue on YouTube. I would love to give the guy credit but after 2 days of searching I cannot find the original video that gave me the idea. If someone else comes across it please let me know in the comments so I can give him credit for the inspiration. He did slightly different setup, but this design came from his concept.

I took the original idea of what he had, and modified it to what I had available as to spend little to no money out of pocket. I had submersible pumps from aquaponics builds. If you do not have one you can get them for under 20 bucks, especially at local stores in fall when they go on clearance. (Aquatic Design and Supplies here locally has this exact one) The tank is an old kitty litter box. The tubing and nipples I got from Amazon. They were pretty cheap as well. The nice thing about the nipples and tubing is they came in a pack of 50 and I have enough tubing to make another complete setup at the new location (V2.0). The heat lamp we had for the chickens in winter so no extra cost there. If you do not have one, you can pick them up lamp and fixture for under $20.

Version 2.0 this was the first design to fix a need at the moment. I am designing some improvements into version 2.0 and some improvements are listed below.

  • I will be using a 55 gal drum for the tank for the reservoir
  • The tank will be filled by rainwater from the roof of the rabbit/chicken barn area (filtered before entering tank with homemade sand/charcoal filter)
  • There will be a heater in the tank. Probably a submersible fish heater unless I find a better alternative before then. I want the water to stay above freezing. The water moving helps keep it from freezing.
  • I will add nipples for the chickens as well. Different type of nipples than the rabbits. Rabbits needed all metal nipples at they can damage the plastic housing of chicken nipples.
  • Version 3.0 may switch over to off grid power and use a solar panel. It may be in V2.0 but time, money, and other projects may prevent that.

Some things I learned. The tubing did not fit tightly enough on some nipples. I added zip ties to make a more snug fit. You may want to go with a slightly smaller ID tube, or just use ties like I did. Not all the nipples leaked where the tubing fit.

If your hose comes out from the circulator, you lose circulation (power out, low water), the tubes, and nipples will freeze solid (if temps are below freezing) and the only way to thaw is wait until the entire thing is above freezing temps. adding warm/hot water MAY work if you have a shorter run of tubing. we had about 30 ft, and not enough pressure to melt the ice in the lines.

Before leaving for any period of time, figure how long it takes your rabbits to drain the tank, and take an average. Some days they drink more than others. Plan accordingly.

You may need to leave both watering systems in place for a few days until they figure it out. Alternatively, letting the old source dry up, and showing water is available through the nipple by pushing the tip, can help train them.

If one rabbit gets it, soon others see and catch on.

Rabbit Nipples

Tubing

Here are some other recommendations of products.

 

Tree Grafting Workshop March 21, 2015 1-5pm

So I can finally publish the workshop details. We are bringing up Darren from Brambleberry Farm to teach a tree grafting workshop. If you haven’t heard about Brambleberry I have some links to past publications with them.

Podcast of tour

Post on tour

Here is the flyer for the workshop

Tree Grafting

Here is the details and how to register

Tree Grafting Workshop

Saturday, Mar 21, 2015, 1:00 PM

Burke Farm
6020 E. Raymond st indianapolis IN 46203 Indianapolis, IN

6 Gardener/Homesteader Attending

Are you intrigued by the ancient art of fusing two trees into one but haven’t been brave enough to give it a try? Do you want to learn a skill that will let you create your own superior fruit trees for $2 or less a tree? Do you have a beloved old family apple tree that you want to start anew in your own backyard? Learn to graft and YOU CAN! This Ma…

Check out this Meetup →

Can a suburban lot be profitable as a farm? Pt 2

Can a suburban lot be profitable as a farm? Pt 2

In the last post I wrote about if it is profitable to run a suburban homestead farm. The answer was it depends. There are so many variables to consider. We touched on rabbits, and fruit trees. Today we are going to cover a few more items that in combination with reduction in spending and layering could make a suburban homestead profitable.

We touched on fruit trees and on using the fruit trees for home-made products such as jams and jellies. If you are to expand the fruit tree aspect to also include home based jams, jellies and baked goods you are adding additional function to your income stream without having to add to your space needs. Most if not all of the preserves will be prepared indoors without the need of additional growing area. Each area is different on the regulations required. Some states, cities, and counties will allow an individual to prepare and sell preserves on the farm without any additional requirements. Some areas require that a commercial kitchen be used, while others will allow it to be prepared on farm, sold off farm, if the kitchen is inspected. Do your research, and there are not only the preparation requirements, but also labeling requirements, on a federal, state, and sometimes local level. Do not be discouraged by the regulations, as many are not too over burdensome. If you are going to make preserves, there will always be waste in the forms of peels, seeds, core of the fruit (as with apples or pears), pulp etc. This is not a waste product. This could also be turned into income, in the form of compost, worms, compost tea, or bartered for other useful products. One local farm will barter fresh meat, in exchange for these types of waste, providing that it is chemical free (no pesticides, herbicide, fungicides etc.). The farm will take your waste and feed it to their pigs, and chickens. This can offset meat and egg purchases. If you are raising your own animals, this could offset any feed costs you may have. While you could also include baked goods, pies, cakes etc. in the same operation relatively easy, and would probably need the same level of inspection or regulations, you would be dependent on outside grains for flour, milk, and possible eggs for such an operation. This is not to say it isn’t profitable, especially if you buy flour in bulk, or have a niche market only using organic flour, or gluten-free products.

Composting can take a waste and turn it into a profit center. Composting isn’t hard, and it can be done indoors or outdoors, small-scale or large. It all depends on your climate and location. Some areas will have regulations on compost, but this is usually on a commercial-scale. We have a varied size of compost activities from an indoor box in a recycled cat litter container, to the 3 bin pallet composting, and each one has different purposes, and contents. The indoor system will use some household composting materials and shredded junk mail, cardboard, and fiber board (cereal boxes). There is no smell, and the worms do all the work. We use only non-glossy paper in these systems. These worms do not process large volumes of materials, and is mainly a use for compost tea, keep worms through the winter, and indoor soil amendments. The outdoor system has yard wastes, leaf litter, grass clippings, left over’s from the vegetable gardens, rabbit manure, and bedding from the chicken coup. People who are just getting started are on the lookout for worms to start their own composting system, or maybe something happened and killed off their worms. This is why it is good to have redundant system and only add questionable materials to one system, or rotate what gets the new materials. You always have a back up worm supply. Some people sell them by the pound, some count out the worms. You can also sell the worm casting, or compost tea. The casting can be added to plants indoor and out, gardens, lawns, around fruit and berry bushes. It is a fertilizer that will not burn, there are no chemical additives, and can be applied at any time. The tea is taken from the castings and made into a liquid fertilizer. Some people sell the tea in 1 gal jugs, others sell the dried castings and instructions on how to make your own tea. Like the castings, the compost tea can be put around any plants, indoors or out. The added benefits of the liquid are that it is readily absorbed by the plant during the application, and when sprayed onto the plant leaves acts a bio-barrier against pests and disease. The compost tea promotes a beneficial biological layer that will detour pests, but also aids in preventing many harmful molds, viruses, and bacteria from colonizing on the leaf surface. Will you be profitable from compost tea alone? Not on a suburban lot. But this is a way to take a waste product and turn it into something beneficial, both for your own farm or homestead and possibly turn a profit.  If you want more info on composting with worms check out Castaway Compost.

In part 3 we will talk chickens. We have hit on them a little here and there, but more details to come. So a recap of what we covered thus far in the series, is Fruits, Rabbits, Compost and worms, and preserves and baking. All of these can be managed at the same time on a suburban lot in conjunction with each other.

Can a suburban lot be profitable as a farm? Pt 1

Can a suburban lot be profitable as a farm? To quote one of my mentors, Jack Spirko from TSP, “It depends”. We have been doing the homesteading, and farm for over three years now and can share some insight.  What is your definition of profitable? Making income from your labor, to turn a profit? What money you take in is larger than what you put into your farm, just the farm? If your definition of profitable just applying to the farming activities or to the property, cars, debts etc? Is this your full time job? There is significant different between homesteading, and farming. Someone may just think you sell what you produce; sell the overage, or just double what you did for yourself. This is not the case.

We have to make some assumptions, and parameters. First, let’s assume a 0.2 typical suburban lot, with no home owners association (HOA), no restrictions on land use, you are in a suburban area close to a major city (less than 1 hr), are in USDA zone 4 or higher, and have no solar blockages to your growing area. I know that is a lot of assumptions. But we have to start somewhere.

Next, is this your only source of income? Is this supplemental? If this is your only source of income, you need to look at your monthly and yearly expenditures. Are your vehicles paid off? Do you have a mortgage? Do you have other debts such as student loans, credit cards? How much are your taxes?

Let’s assume you have a $100,000 home, and pay $1,000/mo mortgage, insurance, utilities etc. This means you have to bring in at minimum $1,000 per month in sales just to have a place to grow. Have expenses, not eating off your property, then you have to make that much more. So, in this scenario, it is highly unlikely that you can be profitable, and live off what you make on your property. It is not impossible but, you would have to be VERY creative, like rabbits and quail in your garage, aquaponics in your house, teach classes, consult, butcher your own meats, and that is just the beginning. You would have to work harder to be profitable on your suburban lot than you have ever worked before. But is IS possible. Expect to put in 100+ hour work weeks, and work all 7 days. Do not expect a vacation, because who would manage your farm and all that it entails while you are gone.

Second scenario, you have no mortgage, because either you were smart and paid it off, retired and finally got the monkey off your back, or for whatever reason. Can it be profitable? Most definitely, assuming the home assumptions are what we are basing things on.  Again, look at your monthly expenditures. Sometimes you may look at ways to reduce in order to not work as hard or in lean months. What are your taxes? You can grow produce, have fruit trees, rabbits, ducks, chickens for meat and eggs, ducks and then sell things like canned goods, jams, jellies, medicinal herbs. This may not work for every scenario. Some legal requirements state you have to make any prepared items in a commercial kitchen. Some will allow your own kitchen to be used provided it is inspected. Some don’t even go that far. Some areas will allow you to sell directly on “farm”, some require a farmers market. If butchering on “farm” you may not need inspection, but a farmers market requires the meat to be processed at a commercial facility. This is a definite possibility, and can be profitable.

Third scenario, you have a suburban lot, but no home on it. You are living in an apartment, but lease or rent the lot. Can you make enough on 0.2 acres to pay for everything? It depends; can you effectively cover all your expenses?  Rent community garden space, sell overage, local CSA, or farm market stand. All possibilities.

Getting into the details on how – The key, stacking functions, and making use of every single waste, resource, or product. The Native Americans had the right idea, of use every single part of something, let nothing goes to waste. I am going to cover what we have learned, and the pitfalls.

Rabbits take up very little room, and are heavy producers per square foot. You can have one buck, four does, and in a double stack configuration, have between 8-12 rabbits every week to butcher and sell in a 6’ x 14’ space. Whole rabbits can sell from $5/lb live weight to $40/lb cleaned and all organic/grass fed. Average weight of rabbit is 5lbs. Stack the function, and you can feed them weeds from gardens, grass from your neighbors lawn (providing they do not chemically treat it), and pruning from your vegetable patch.  You can sell the manure as fertilizer, use it yourself, add it to compost (sell the compost), put it in worm bins (sell the worms, compost, or worm tea).  If you tractor the rabbits you reduce any feed costs. You can also sell some of the better kits as potential breed stock to other farmers. Then you can also sell the pelts. You can tan them yourself and increase the price you get per pelt. If you have dogs, and you are butchering the rabbits you can feed them the innards. You can sell rabbits feet. The ears are sold as dog treats. Chickens will also pick the bones clean. You may have the initial investment of cages, feeding trays, shelter etc, but it can be easily recouped, provided you have a viable market for meat rabbits. While it is becoming more popular with the homesteading crowd, it hasn’t found its way into mainstream food sources. Some higher end restaurants, or restaurants specializing in locally grown or chemical free options may be a good place to sell your product.

Rabbit hutch 1 Rabbit hutch

In 0.2 acres you can have 5-10 fruit trees. This is in addition to a house, depending on the home size, providing you get the dwarf varieties. You will also want to prune them to optimize harvests, and maximize space. If you were to espalier the trees you can get even more to grow. This will give you a fruit crop to sell, or raw materials for baked goods, jams, jellies, fruit leathers. You could even sell trimmings or grafting from your trees. Trees could be generic apples, pears, cherries or you could try more exotic fruits pomegranate, fig, or the jujube (it does not produce candy). More people tend to buy what they know, and more chance to make what you need, but the rare varieties fetch a much heavier price. No chemicals or sprays get a higher premium, but more susceptible to disease and pests. Small orchards like a suburban postage size do not get plagued like the larger mono crop farms because of a greater biodiversity. If you have chickens, and ducks on your micro farm they are pest mangers in themselves. We will go into chicken in part 2.

Espalier 2 Espalier 3 Espalier espalier1

Herb Blurb – Yarrow

Achillea Millefolium (Yarrow)

Yarrow Diagram
Click for larger view

 

Yarrow, also called Soldiers Wound Wort has been in use since ancient Greece. Its name derives from Achilles who was rumored to use it on his soldiers to stop bleeding on the battlefield.  Yarrow was also used on the battlefield during the Civil War especially when supplies were sparse. Yarrow comes in a variety of colors including, white, yellow, red, pink and orange. Yarrow was used by Native Americans for a variety of issues all across the US.

Suggested uses

A tea made with yarrow is good to tread common colds and is said to help expel wastes through the pores. Mainly given as a blood purifier. Macerated and applied to wounds it can stop bleeding, and act as an antibacterial agent. Yarrow has been used for fever, common cold, hay fever, absence of menstruation, dysentery, diarrhea, loss of appetite, gastrointestinal (GI) tract discomfort, and to induce sweating.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/y/yarrow02.html

Parts to use

Stems, leaves and flowers, collected in the wild state, in August, when in flower.

yarrow
Click for larger view

How to use

Raw – Some people have found chewing the leaves will help alleviate a toothache. The flowers and young leaves can be added to salads.

Tea – Yarrow as a tea can help purify the blood and expel wastes through the pores.

Salve -Ointment – Highlanders of Scotland use a yarrow ointment on sheep for wound care

Macerated – taken in the field, macerate (chew, crush, grind) the leaves and apply directly on wounds to stop bleeding and reduce infection.

Bath – To stop bleeding of hemorrhoids, wounds, to alleviate cramps a bath using the macerated leaves or tincture from leaves.

Flavor additive – prior to using hops, yarrow was used to flavor beer. It was said that yarrow made the beer more potent.

Tincture – Alcohol (vodka) a tincture can be made to extract essential oils rather than drying the herb for later use.

Growing

Yarrow is a perennial here in the Midwest. It will self seed if allowed to. It prefers full sun and well drained soil but does well in many unfavorable conditions. It is a drought tolerant plant. Yarrow is a good companion plant as it attracts predatory wasps who prey on other pest insects as well as it attracts ladybugs and hoverflies.

Storage

Light is the enemy of medicinal herbs. Dried leaves, stems, and flowers should be stored in paper bag out of light. Tinctures should be stored in a dark glass container away from light. Sunlight is the worst as the UV will break down the compounds that are beneficial

Want to learn more come check out our herb class on August 23

Learn about more herbs

 

 

Indy Rezone comment meeting Jul 16

The re-zoning committee is having two open comment times July 16th. Noon and 5:30. Not too often is the powers enacting changes open to comments from the general public. I will be there probably for both sessions to just hear what others have to say, and voice my own opinions. If it impacts you make an effort to show. Even if you are not directly impacted show up to support those that want to homestead and be self sufficient here in Marion Co. I would love to have it be standing room only! PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE share with anyone and everyone you think could be impacted.

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Medicinal Herb Class Preview

I wanted people to get a feel for what to expect in the Medicinal Herb Class Preview, with handouts from the class. This is just one page, and is only the text. There are 56 other plants and bonus materials. We will be discussing in more details during the tour. What we have experienced, and touring through all what is growing while on site.  We will also have live plants for sale, fresh you pick cuttings, dried plants,  and more. Touch,  and smell some different preparations, ask questions, get answers. Disclaimer, we are not medical practitioners, and we are only conveying information we have learned, and have been using as a family.  Seek your own information before using any medicinal herbs.

Calendula– We will also have a chart in the handout of actual pictures of plants from out place.

RSVP – please use this link to RSVP so we know how many packets to put together. You can also prepay online.