Tag Archives: goats

New additions and updates

Yes, yes, ye. It has been a while since we have done an update. We have been very busy since buying a farm. I would say I will go into more deation on some of these topics and builds, but, who has the time!

We are now at 115ish animals on the farm. Yes, that is roughly 100 new animals since March 2016. We may be around 150+ by spring 2017. We have had our first births on the farm. Seven American Guinea Hogs and two goats (only one lived). The AGH piglets are for sale if you are interested in your own grass fed pork, and we can partner with a family member who also has AGH if you are interested in an unrelated breeding pair.

We have planted hundreds of trees and bushes.

We have literally put in miles of fencing, and hand hammered hundreds of fence posts.

  • 8,615 ft of woven, chain link, & welded wire fence
  • 10,575 ft of electric fence
  • 630  hand hammered six-ft T posts
  • 3.6 MILES of hand installed fencing.

And this is only enclosing  8.75 acres of the 32 acre property.  We still have a bunch to do.

fence

We have two new livestock guardian dogs (LGD). Freyja and Sigyn. They will be training with Jack. Total dogs 5

7 new piglets

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1 new goat kid “Bucky”. He will be a breeder.

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1 new breeding male goat The Todd

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4 new barn cats to keep mice away

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Marcy
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Belatrix
Puss
Puss

“Boots” refused to have his picture taken for posting.

8 new sheep, although some are just visiting.

The Girls
The Girls
Mocha
Mocha

We have added on a sunroom/greenhouse to protect some plants, start plants and seeds early this spring, and house any bottle babies that may need some help when it is cold outside.

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400+ bales of hay put up, and still more to come

Still to come or works in progress

  • 10,000 gallon creek/pond through the orchard with koi, waterfalls, and bridge
  • Sugar shack for maple, black walnut, and sassafras syrups
  • Campground with a variety of style cabins and primitive campsites
  • Major barn addition with blacksmithing area
  • Spring house
  • Solar power
  • Wind power
  • Water power
  • Hoop house over garden

Whispering Woods Haunted Halloween Hike Fall 2017 along with hog roast, and party. 2nd weekend in October.

 

Follow us on Facebook for updates, as we don’t get too much time to update online. Interested in a tour, contact us for availability.

 

 

 

Our first livestock auction

If you have never heard of an animal auction and are looking into getting animals for homesteading you may want to check them out. The family and I went out last weekend to check things out. None of us have ever been so it was going to be an experience. If nothing else the kids could check out different types of livestock.

It started later in the evening and we went prepared with snacks and eating dinner along the way. Veedersburg Sale Barn The auction was about an hour and a half from our house in the city. It started at 6pm but we arrived at 5 to check things out first and get registered. If you have never been to an auction you must register to get a bidding number. When you bid on an item, your number is recorded. It takes about 20 min or so to get everything registered and you can pay and leave with your item, or stay and pay at the end. Arriving early gave us the opportunity to check out all the livestock and equipment. Not only were animals being auctions but feeders, watering containers, cages and other homesteading and animal equipment as well as hay.

While checking things out we spotted a few things we liked, and might bid on. We went looking for Kaki ducks, and if it was a good deal, maybe get a few. There were a couple of calves, goats, rabbits, turkeys, ducks, pheasants, fertilized eggs, guinea pigs, quail geese, pigeons, and a whole bunch of chickens in all shapes sizes and breeds. Hundreds and hundreds of chickens. Having only chickens as livestock at the homestead (with exception of fish) our only comparison for pricing was as chicks in catalogs or at some of our local farm stores. $1.50-10.00 depending on breed etc. We saw 1 year old laying hens going for as low as $2.00 each. For us this was a deal. You didn’t have to feed for 6 months, no heat lamp, no brooder boxes, and you get almost instant eggs. Now I have checked out Craigslist for layers and 1 year old layers can go from $20-40 each in our area. $2.00 was a steal in comparison to raising them for 6 months. With 22 chickens on hand at the moment we were maxed out on hens.

We did see some ducks later in the evening, or should I say morning (1am) but they were older and we have read that ducks will imprint on you when they are young. We wanted that kind of relationship with our animals and opted to get chicks later (turns out the next day).

We watched a few rabbit lots go by, what was available, and pricing. Because we had checked things out before hand we knew there were better rabbits coming. We ended up picking up 4 rabbits, 3 does and a buck. We are going to use them for our breeders. So, because rabbits weren’t on the agenda, guess who got to come home and get materials for building rabbit hutches.

More details on rabbits, hutches, ducks and duck house in a later post.

Each auctioneer was different. We had 4 over the span of the night. The first one would tell what sex, and breed the animals were and sometimes age. The second one would only tell you the sex. The third said nothing other than how many and type of animals. He seemed to go much faster and didn’t spend much time allowing others to bit. You either got his attention right off or it was gone.

The auction was a learning experience. Some things we picked up for next time, and advice to others going. Research what you are looking for before getting to the auction. Often they are in the middle of nowhere and there is no wifi or cell service. Show up early and inspect the animals. Know the order of the lots. You would hate to miss the animals you were looking for on a bathroom run. Plan on staying late, we left around 1:30 am and there were still plenty of animals left (5pm-1:30 am). If you don’t know what to look for bring someone with you who does. Ours had hard bleacher seating, so next time we are bringing cushions, sitting on those for 7-8 hours makes the backside sore. If bringing kids, bring entertainment, and explain BEFORE that, yes they are all cute animals, you cannot take them ALL home. Also, isolate your new animals for a period before introducing to your existing animals; this is to protect any potential diseases or parasites. If you wear you work boots, mud boots or footwear you normally wear around your animals clean and disinfect them before going around your animals. There are lots of animals moving through the sale barn and lots of potential to bring something home. The auction is a great way to pick up equipment for a much reduced rate, but be sure to inspect it before you bid on it. Make friends with the people around you. Turns out the couple next to me is looking to slim down their herd of milking goats, and we are looking to get some. Save us a trip to the auction barn, for goats and equipment. The couple on the other side sells piglets, and I know two people looking for piglets. Unless the auction lists what is up for sale, you never know what you may see, and for me it is like a treasure hunt. Each new lot brings new potential. Don’t get stuck on one particular animal or lot. Sometimes a bidding wars can erupt because two people let emotions get the price WAY above what it should be. We saw a baby goat go for $260 when the twin only went for $70. Go figure. Listen to the auctioneer carefully for several lots before ever making a bid, you can distinguish between $20/lot for 20 birds and $20/bird in a lot of 20. A difference of $380.

This was our first but most definitely not our last auction. So more on different auction barns, and what we learn along the way.