Tag Archives: rabbits

002 Chickens vs Rabbits for meat source on homestead

1st podcast in a long time and today we are talking about chickens vs rabbits for meat source on homestead.

One thing after listening to the show I never mentioned about what to do with animals in heat of summer and cold of winter. The rabbits have been fine over winter down to -10 here in Indiana, and they are under cover, and only covered with tarps over the whole cage area. No issues. The Chickens are in an enclosed coop and only a heat lamp, this is ONLY to keep egg production up. If we wanted to not get eggs over winter this wouldn’t be necessary. Summer, we add frozen 2L bottles of water to the rabbit cages only on really hot days. The chicken coop we take a pannel off and only have chicken wire to allow more air to circulate. So no real big issues.

 

Side note, ADD makes me all over the place, so be warned. I try to go by an outline and notes…ADD usually takes over. I will get better, I hope.

 

Links mentioned in the show

2 Midwest Guys

Rabbit waterer

How to build a community through gardening Feb 28th

Details here $20 and lunch is included

Indiana Small Farm Conference March 5th-7th

Details here. $ to enter but varies depending on day(s) and age/situation (adult, student, under 12 etc)

Tree Grafting Workshop March 21

Brambleberry Farms is teaching how to graft. $90 for 4 hrs of instruction all materials provided, and you take home 4 custom grafted trees.

Register and details here only 5 spots left.

March 23 7-9pm Rush Co Fairgrounds

Free class on Aquaponics, Hydroponics, organic Gardening

details will be here

 

Not only do we put out content on our blog, but we also share, post, and write information on our social media sites.

Facebook – Wolf-Beach Farms

Twitter  @WolfBeachFarms

YouTube – Content is thin at the moment, but we hope to change that this year.

For classes in and around Indianapolis we share them on our Meetup site.

New podcasts will be coming soon as well.

Rick also has a LinkedIn Profile.

July 26th General “Farm” tour

People have asked to have another general farm tour. We are having another on July 26th 9am. It will again be $20/person.

If weekend tours do not work for you schedule, please contact us and we can try to arrange one that better fits into your schedule.

Signup and register here.

Come out see, ask questions, see what is going on. It is estimated 3 hrs but I like to talk, and if there are more questions we are not on a time constraint. Some areas may have more questions or information if people are interested.

Suburban “farm” tour. Come out and see what is possible on 0.2 acres of suburbia. We have ducks, chickens, 5000 gal outdoor aquaponics, 4000 gal frog pond, a new 50 gallon indoor aquaponic system, fruit trees, berry patches, edible landscaping, rabbits, grapes composting, vermicomposting, vertical gardening, rain harvesting, and medicinal herbs. The goats may be on property, if not we will discuss different aspect of back yard goats as well.

In addition to covering all of the above and lessons learned through “failing”

We will cover how to use an A-Frame level for finding contours on your property as well as how to make an A-frame level.

Anti-chicken tractors

Where to find materials for cheap or free

We will talk and show different aspects of permaculture we are practicing.

Talk about the many ways to use a aquarium air pump to benefit your property.

Making and using compost tea

Possibly have a plant exchange as well (please if attending put what you will bring in the comments so others may benefit/trade)

Seem like a lot? We are only using about 40% of our 0.2 acres.

This is our home, and please respect we do not let the public in our home, so no public restrooms are available. You may also park in the drive as we will have moved our vehicles to accommodate you.

We can/do accept PayPal/credit debit cards. However cannot do both cash and electronic payments on the Meet-up space. Our PayPal ID is wolfbeachfarms@gmail.com and we use both Square and Paypal Credit/debit payments. Space is limited.

Start time is 9am. If you need to make payments or otherwise, please show up a few minutes early.

 

What’s new this year update with pictures

2014 has proven to be our biggest push into self-sufficiency and experimentation yet. I believe with all the prior years combined, this year still has us doing more new experiments and new additions. This is just a portion of what we have going on. This doesn’t include urban food plot project, building a “tiny” house and furnishings, recycled pallet projects, normal vegetable gardening, classes, medicinal herbs, food storage, podcasts etc.  Want to learn more on the podcast…check out 2 Midwest Guys.

Rabbits

This year we started breeding meat rabbits to supplement our meat and protein supply. Two does have had kits and out of 15 rabbits 6 have survived. We are giving the does one more chance before culling them.  We are hoping for 6+ kits per litter,  ideally 9+ kits per litter with little to no losses. We are waiting on our 3rd doe to kit. We have been supplementing the pellets with yard waste mainly in the form of weeds and grass clippings from when we do mow. 2 years ago we seeded our lawn with alfalfa and clover and now are able to benefit from that. By supplementing with yard “wastes” we have greatly reduced our dependency on pellets.  The rabbits seem to prefer the fresh greens over pellets, and we feed less, and the pellets are more of a back up to feeding them.

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Ducks

Ducks were another new addition this year, and so far have been somewhat a love hate relationship. They refuse to eat duck food, and instead prefer fish food. Looking at the protein content of the chick starter/grower it is 18% protein, and the fish food was 38% protein. This fact, is probably why they are almost full grown in 3 months time. They have eaten all of my water plants, my lilies, my cat tails, my reeds, my duckweed, my Azolla. They have eaten everything, which resulted in an algae bloom, and we now have green water. We added snails to the system to help clean the waste and water. They ate those too. They ate all the leaves and bark off my willow trees I was hoping to help clean the water. They ate ½ of the goldfish in the pond. So far no duck eggs, if they keep this up, we will be eating them and marking it up as a lesson learned. On a positive note, in the last two weeks they have moved into the vegetable garden away from my pond (it could use a break). They have eaten and trampled the majority of the weeds and seem to have left my vegetables alone. If they keep this up, there may be hope for them. If not, Duck, it’s what’s for dinner.

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New aquaponics design

The new design took the 400 gal in ground pond, and added a 35 foot creek, a radial filter, and 8 grow beds bringing the system to roughly 5000 gallons. The new design has had some setbacks, mainly the ducks and my own issue of adjusting the pH. We are working through some of the issues, and hopefully it will start to recover. I have some ultra concentrated bacteria on its way and we will see how that works. The frog pond and plant nursery is doing much better. The frog pond, which was once my main aquaponics, is doing well with more frogs showing up, and I am now using it as a trellis, and plant nursery. The benefit, no ducks. I finally caught “Gigantor” and now have a new nemesis now that the Gigantor challenge has been met. Chipmunks.

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Sun chokes aka Jerusalem Artichokes

Sun chokes are a new addition for us this year. They have tubers similar to potatoes, and a sunflower like top. The tops can be fed to livestock, and the tubers can be cooked and eaten. The preferred method seems to be fried like fried potatoes. The sun chokes seem to be doing well. We won’t know how well until harvest later this fall. We plan on harvesting ½ and leaving ½ for next year.  On our tour to Brambleberry Farm we are planning on getting a different variety, Purple chokes.

Figs

Fig is a new fruit for us this year. After our purple peach didn’t make it over the winter (we did get a bunch of seedlings started), we wanted another tree in the area. The fig we got from Brambleberry Farm is doing very well. Once the tree is more established we plan on taking cuttings and propagating more trees from the mother plant. I remember having a fig tree as a child in Louisiana.

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Ground Nuts

Ground nuts are something we got on a whim, and another new addition this year. At first we didn’t think they would grow but after a few weeks we have now begun seeing vines growing and climbing. No progress as to what is going on under the ground. Once they are ready to harvest it supposedly is another protein source. We may hold a few back to propagate next year if they do well.

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Tilapia

Tilapia were a new addition to the aquaponics portion of our operation. We have had goldfish, catfish, bluegill, redear, tadpoles, and crawfish. We got ours locally as 40 fingerlings from Blue Note Hatchery. All 40 survived, however, 2 met tragic ends on my part while moving a pump. They are growing strong and getting big. I am not sure if they will make it to the big pond or not. I am not sure about the ducks and the tilapia. Either the fish need to be much bigger or I may put them in a 275 gal tank for grow out. I did notice that our temperatures inside the house were not warm enough for them and I had to add supplemental heat to keep the water 70-80 degrees. Once I did this they started eating like the ravenous hoard.

Amaranth

Amaranth is a grain alternative. The varieties we got are native to South and Central America but will grow well here in the warmer summer months.  We actually have a native variety here in Indiana and the local farmers call it pigweed. Pigweed has become almost immune to most commercial sprays. Family members who are involved with large scale agriculture have stated it is becoming a real problem. The two varieties we got were both for appearance, yield, and hardiness.  This is another plant we will harvest ½ for use, and the other ½ will go for seed stock for the following year.

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Elderberry

We picked up 2 elderberry plants from Brambleberry farm when Dustin and I went down for our 2 Midwest Guys tour. We have an open tour June 7th which is THIS Saturday. They are still in the pots as we were babying them and wanted to make sure good and hardy before putting into the ground. That is a project for this week. You need two different plant varieties to pollinate unless you have a wild one in your area. This is sometimes the case with people in rural areas. This will be used as a food and a medicinal once we start getting fruit.

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Gumi Berry

The Gumi berry is still a little sad and we are not putting it out in the “General Population” until it is a bit bigger. The “wee one” will likely trample it. This is a nitrogen fixer, as well as a food producer. I will take pictures on Saturday of what it is supposed to look like when grown.

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Goji Berry

While the goji isn’t new (we had it last year) apparently the ducks seem to like the leaves and ate it down to the ground. We may be starting back a year on this one. We protected them, and see if that helps. If not it will have to find a new location. This is more a warning, ducks will eat your goji, and well anything else that is green.

Hops

While the hops aren’t new I wanted to share how well they are doing this year. We now have a living privacy wall and shaded area just from the hops vines

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Canning pineapple

Canning isn’t something new to us, but we tried canning fresh pineapple this year.  Aldi had a great deal of $0.89 per pineapple. We bought a bunch and made dehydrated fruit snacks, canned a bunch and even from some of the waste material made fresh pineapple juice. Each pineapple yielded about 1 ½ quart of pineapple, and ½ cup of juice.  Cheaper than buying canned pineapple in the store, I controlled what goes into them, I got bonus of 5 quarts of juice, and feed for animals. I took the woody centers that are not fit to eat, and ran through my food mill. Collected the juice and fed the pulp to the chickens. I cut as close as I could to the outer peel, and any “eyes” I cut out and ran through the juicer. Anything the chickens wouldn’t eat, went to the worms and compost. You can actually regrow pineapple from the tops.  While I am a big fan of this, I don’t have the indoor space to keep it over winter, and was a bit more work than I wanted to do moving it in and out. When we get a better greenhouse this may be an option.  This is something to look out for of eating and buying within season. If you can find a good deal on something if at a farmer’s market, store, or even your own back yard, find ways to preserve it and stock up.

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Scything

Most people today don’t know what a scythe is. Think what the grim reaper carries. With the addition of the rabbits, and soon to add goats, we needed a way to get hay and feed to them cheap and easy. We didn’t have access to a mechanical way to cut, and bale pasture hay/weeds unless we paid someone to do it, and that just wasn’t in the cards. We did however have access to old fashion scythes. This is how people used to gut fields before machinery, on the cheap, just using your time and labor. I can tell you it was a workout, and while a bit sore, we both like the manual labor, and proving we can do it. I think we as a society have become too dependent on things that make life easy and another reason we have a weight problem as a nation. Before we invested in a new hand tool, and an expensive one at that ($200-500) we wanted to give it a try. We found some older (60 or so years) tools in my wife’s grandfathers barn. I researched how to clean, sharpen, and bring back these older pieces of technology to life. Calling around, I couldn’t find any stores locally that carried a scythe, let alone any parts or maintenance pieces. As with everything, I made do with what I had.  After cutting about 1/4 an acre in an hour or so I think we are hooked. We may get a few tips from Brambleberry Farm as Darren and Espri use the scythe a their place. We think with a little practice, and tips on our technique this may be a good solution. I already came up with a way to make a mini baler out of repurposed cat litter boxes.

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This blog has already become too long; I will have to write-up all the medicinal and culinary herbs later. Below is a list of all the new herbs we have added this year.  I will continue to put posts on the Herb Blurb page with more details on each herb as time goes on.

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Wormwood

Jewelweed

Ma-huang (Ephedra)

Witch Hazel

Prickly Pear

St Johns Wart

Motherwart

Tansey

Boneset

Horehound

Chickweed

Rose of Sharron

Apple mint

Garlic Chives

Comfrey

 

Suburban “farm” tour May 18th

Suburban “farm” tour. Come out and see what is possible on 0.2 acres of suburbia. We have ducks, chickens, 5000 gal outdoor aquaponics, 30 gallon indoor system, fruit trees, berry patches, edible landscaping, rabbits, grapes composting, vermicomposting, vertical gardening, rain harvesting, and medicinal herbs. The goats won’t be on property yet, but we will discuss different aspect of back yard goats as well.

In addition to covering all of the above and lessons learned through

We will cover how to use an A-Frame level for finding contours on your property as well as how to make an A-frame level.

Anti-chicken tractors

Where to find materials for cheap or free

We will talk and show different aspects of permaculture we are practicing.

Talk about the many ways to use a aquarium air pump to benefit your property.

Making and using compost tea

Possibly have a plant exchange as well (please if attending put what you will bring in the comments so others may benefit/trade)

Seem like a lot? We are only using about 40% of our 0.2 acres.

This is our home, and please respect we do not let the public in our home, so no public restrooms are available. You may also park in the drive as we will have moved our vehicles to accommodate you.

We can/do accept PayPal/credit debit cards. However cannot do both cash and electronic payments on the Meet-up space. Our PayPal ID is wolfbeachfarms@gmail.com and we use both Square and Paypal Credit/debit payments. Space is limited.

Start time is 1pm. If you need to make payments or otherwise, please show up a few minutes early. Estimated end time is 4pm

RSVP required. Please use this site.

 

Our first livestock auction

If you have never heard of an animal auction and are looking into getting animals for homesteading you may want to check them out. The family and I went out last weekend to check things out. None of us have ever been so it was going to be an experience. If nothing else the kids could check out different types of livestock.

It started later in the evening and we went prepared with snacks and eating dinner along the way. Veedersburg Sale Barn The auction was about an hour and a half from our house in the city. It started at 6pm but we arrived at 5 to check things out first and get registered. If you have never been to an auction you must register to get a bidding number. When you bid on an item, your number is recorded. It takes about 20 min or so to get everything registered and you can pay and leave with your item, or stay and pay at the end. Arriving early gave us the opportunity to check out all the livestock and equipment. Not only were animals being auctions but feeders, watering containers, cages and other homesteading and animal equipment as well as hay.

While checking things out we spotted a few things we liked, and might bid on. We went looking for Kaki ducks, and if it was a good deal, maybe get a few. There were a couple of calves, goats, rabbits, turkeys, ducks, pheasants, fertilized eggs, guinea pigs, quail geese, pigeons, and a whole bunch of chickens in all shapes sizes and breeds. Hundreds and hundreds of chickens. Having only chickens as livestock at the homestead (with exception of fish) our only comparison for pricing was as chicks in catalogs or at some of our local farm stores. $1.50-10.00 depending on breed etc. We saw 1 year old laying hens going for as low as $2.00 each. For us this was a deal. You didn’t have to feed for 6 months, no heat lamp, no brooder boxes, and you get almost instant eggs. Now I have checked out Craigslist for layers and 1 year old layers can go from $20-40 each in our area. $2.00 was a steal in comparison to raising them for 6 months. With 22 chickens on hand at the moment we were maxed out on hens.

We did see some ducks later in the evening, or should I say morning (1am) but they were older and we have read that ducks will imprint on you when they are young. We wanted that kind of relationship with our animals and opted to get chicks later (turns out the next day).

We watched a few rabbit lots go by, what was available, and pricing. Because we had checked things out before hand we knew there were better rabbits coming. We ended up picking up 4 rabbits, 3 does and a buck. We are going to use them for our breeders. So, because rabbits weren’t on the agenda, guess who got to come home and get materials for building rabbit hutches.

More details on rabbits, hutches, ducks and duck house in a later post.

Each auctioneer was different. We had 4 over the span of the night. The first one would tell what sex, and breed the animals were and sometimes age. The second one would only tell you the sex. The third said nothing other than how many and type of animals. He seemed to go much faster and didn’t spend much time allowing others to bit. You either got his attention right off or it was gone.

The auction was a learning experience. Some things we picked up for next time, and advice to others going. Research what you are looking for before getting to the auction. Often they are in the middle of nowhere and there is no wifi or cell service. Show up early and inspect the animals. Know the order of the lots. You would hate to miss the animals you were looking for on a bathroom run. Plan on staying late, we left around 1:30 am and there were still plenty of animals left (5pm-1:30 am). If you don’t know what to look for bring someone with you who does. Ours had hard bleacher seating, so next time we are bringing cushions, sitting on those for 7-8 hours makes the backside sore. If bringing kids, bring entertainment, and explain BEFORE that, yes they are all cute animals, you cannot take them ALL home. Also, isolate your new animals for a period before introducing to your existing animals; this is to protect any potential diseases or parasites. If you wear you work boots, mud boots or footwear you normally wear around your animals clean and disinfect them before going around your animals. There are lots of animals moving through the sale barn and lots of potential to bring something home. The auction is a great way to pick up equipment for a much reduced rate, but be sure to inspect it before you bid on it. Make friends with the people around you. Turns out the couple next to me is looking to slim down their herd of milking goats, and we are looking to get some. Save us a trip to the auction barn, for goats and equipment. The couple on the other side sells piglets, and I know two people looking for piglets. Unless the auction lists what is up for sale, you never know what you may see, and for me it is like a treasure hunt. Each new lot brings new potential. Don’t get stuck on one particular animal or lot. Sometimes a bidding wars can erupt because two people let emotions get the price WAY above what it should be. We saw a baby goat go for $260 when the twin only went for $70. Go figure. Listen to the auctioneer carefully for several lots before ever making a bid, you can distinguish between $20/lot for 20 birds and $20/bird in a lot of 20. A difference of $380.

This was our first but most definitely not our last auction. So more on different auction barns, and what we learn along the way.